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Maximum RAM memory supported


Fernando Gregoire
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Hi,

I want to know the maximum RAM memory that I can add to my computers. I look for it on Motherboard\Chipset,North Bridge, but I am not sure if the maximum memory reported here corresponds to the phisical memory I can really include on my computer or if it refers to another kind of memory.

If this is not referred to RAM memory, could someone please indicate me the page where I can see the maximum RAM memory I can really add to my computers?

Thanks a lot!

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On the Motherboard / Chipset page AIDA64 reports the capabilities of the chipset (or the IMC of the processor), and not the capabilities of the motherboard design. Because in several cases -- for cost-saving or motherboard dimension constraints -- motherboard manufacturers put less DIMM slots on the motherboard than what the chipset could handle. In such cases the actual max. amount of system memory that you can install could be typically 50% of what AIDA64 reports as the chipset capability.

Regards,

Fiery

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Thanks Fiery for your reply.

If the actual maximum memory is determined by the DIMM slot(s), how can I could know how many RAM memory support each slot? I am asking it because, for example, my desktop computer has two DIMM slots. However, I'd like to know if each slot support a maximum of 4 or 8 GB; depending on this I could have 16 GB (the maximum the chipset could handle) or just only 8.

In the case of my netbook computer I am still more confused. The chipset could handle a maximum of 4 GB and the machine has currently only 2. On the bottom side of the computer there is a closed slot for RAM.

I'm sure this computer has only one DIMM slot. The question I'd like to ask here is if it designed to be opened and, if it's, could I put a single 4 GB RAM "card". If it is useful, the model (AIDA64 recognices it) is an Asus Eee PC 1015 PE.

Thanks a lot for your quick response!

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The most accurate and dependable information is in the motherboard user's manual, because even the BIOS could limit the amount of memory that can be utilized :(

AFAIK Asus Eee PC 1015PE has an Atom N5xx Pineview processor. Such processors can use up to 2GB of system memory, 1GB per DIMM slot, with two DIMM slots supported. If you could tell me the model name of your desktop motherboard, we can check that too.

Generally speaking, if a chipset or CPU IMC is capable of supporting e.g. a total of 8GB system RAM in 4 DIMM slots, it means one DIMM can be up to 2GB in size (8GB divided by 4 DIMM slots). There are exceptions from that rule though, so it's best to check both the chipset's datasheet and the motherboard manual.

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My desktop motherboard is AsRock H55M-le. If this information is on the manual, I downloaded it in PDF format and, if it is necesary, I have the printed Quick Installation Guide since I purchased this motherboard separately.

But in the case of the netbook where the manual does not cover this type of information about hardware, BIOS and motherboard, the processor is 64-bit capable. Why I would want to install a 64-bit operating system not having 4 GB+ RAM memory? Has a 64-bit any advantage on these cases?

Thanks and sorry for making too many questions per post!

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According ASRock's website, H55M-LE supports 8GB system RAM in 2 DIMM slots, while its big brother (H55M-GE) supports 16GB system RAM in 4 DIMM slots. So your motherboard can hold two pieces of 4GB memory modules.

64-bit software have the potential to perform faster, but most of them perform a bit slower actually, due to 64-bit code is being longer than similar code in 32-bit. With an Atom processor it makes virtually no sense to switch to 64-bit.

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According ASRock's website, H55M-LE supports 8GB system RAM in 2 DIMM slots, while its big brother (H55M-GE) supports 16GB system RAM in 4 DIMM slots. So your motherboard can hold two pieces of 4GB memory modules.

64-bit software have the potential to perform faster, but most of them perform a bit slower actually, due to 64-bit code is being longer than similar code in 32-bit. With an Atom processor it makes virtually no sense to switch to 64-bit.

Thanks Fiery. According your information I will not switch (at least for now) my netbook to 64-bit Windows, because I not use any program that is only available for 64-bit architecture and, also, I don't want to miss native compatibility with 16-bit old text adventures (I know applications like Dosbox and Aeon, but I'm blind and these applications renders the output graphically) :)

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