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Fiery

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Everything posted by Fiery

  1. Fiery

    List index out of bounds (5)

    We've tried to reproduce the issue, but it doesn't come up on our test systems. Do you have any hardware monitoring modules (Sensor Icons, OSD Panel, Desktop Gadget, SensorPanel, LCD, External Applications, Logging, Alerting) enabled? What is the AIDA64 page or feature that you have last showing before you hid the AIDA64 main window?
  2. Fiery

    Wrong Temps Sensors Corsair ax1200i

    1) Do you mean Corsair's own software only shows the temperature reading that AIDA64 labels as Power Supply #2, and doesn't show any other temperature readings for your PSU? If that's the case, then that alone doesn't render the other 2 temperature readings in AIDA64 invalid. 2) Are all 3 temperature readings related to your PSU change (fluctuate) with the overall thermal state of your system? If that's the case, then I'd say all 3 readings are valid for your PSU.
  3. We've added support for character based LCD displays using Till Harbaum's LCD2USB protocol, as described at: LCD2USB - LCD to USB converter You can enable the LCD device from AIDA64 / main menu / File / Preferences / Hardware Monitoring / LCD. After enabling it, make sure to set the LCD size (on the same page of the AIDA64 Preferences), since LCD2USB-capable devices will not provide such information to AIDA64. Currently the following LCD sizes are supported: 16x2 16x4 20x2 20x4 40x2 40x4 The only thing needed to enable this feature is having the appropriate LCD2USB drivers installed, and the LCD to be connected to a USB port. You can verify if your device is LCD2USB compliant by finding the device on the Devices / USB Devices page in AIDA64, and checking its Device ID. It should be 0403-C630. You can find the new AIDA64 beta update at: http://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta Please let us know if you find any difficulties enabling or using this new feature. Also let us know if you've got another kind of LCD device that is currently unsupported by AIDA64. BTW, Abacom (ExpertProfi), AlphaCool, Digital Devices, Mad Catz Venom, Matrix Orbital, and SDC Megtron LCD displays are also supported now by the latest AIDA64 beta. BTW, we're planning to support Till Harbaum's graphical LCD device as well, as described at: GLCD2USB - graphic LCD to USB converter Regards, Fiery
  4. We're rolling out a new major update to AIDA64 in a few weeks. It will feature the usual improvements to support the latest and greatest hardware technologies, such as GPU details for AMD Radeon R5, R7 and R9 Series and nVIDIA GeForce GTX 760 Ti OEM, and optimized benchmarks for AMD Kaveri and Intel Bay Trail. But most importantly, we're introducing a brand new benchmark panel that offers a set of OpenCL GPGPU benchmarks that you can launch from AIDA64 / main menu / Tools / GPGPU Benchmarks. These benchmarks are designed to measure GPGPU computing performance via different OpenCL workloads. Every benchmark methods are designed to work on up to 16 GPUs, including AMD, Intel and nVIDIA GPUs, in any combination. Of course CrossFire and SLI configurations, and both dGPUs and APUs are also fully supported. HSA configurations are handled via preliminary support. Basically any computing capable device will be benchmarked that appears as a GPU device among OpenCL devices. The OpenCL benchmark methods currently offered are not specifically optimized for any GPU architectures. Instead, the AIDA64 OpenCL module relies on the OpenCL compiler to optimize the OpenCL kernel to run best on the underlying hardware. The OpenCL kernels used for these benchmarks are compiled in real-time, using the actual OpenCL driver the OpenCL GPU device belongs to. Due to that approach, it is always best to have all video drivers (Catalyst, ForceWare, HD Graphics, etc) updated to their latest & greatest version. For compilation the following OpenCL compiler options are passed: -cl-fast-relaxed-math -cl-mad-enable. On top of that, the GPGPU Benchmark Panel also has a CPU column, for comparison purposes. The CPU measurements however are not obtained via OpenCL, but using native x86/x64 machine code, utilizing available instruction set extensions like SSE, AVX, AVX2, FMA and XOP. The CPU benchmarks are very similar to the old CPU and FPU benchmarks AIDA64 has got, but this time they measure maximum computing rates (FLOPS, IOPS). The CPU benchmarks are heavily multi-threaded, and are optimized for every CPU architectures introduced since the first Pentium came out. The following benchmark methods are currently offered. We've indicated the x86/x64 CPU benchmark difference in brackets where there is a different approach in benchmarking. 1) Memory Read: Measures the bandwidth between the GPU device and the CPU, effectively measuring the performance the GPU could copy data from its own device memory into the system memory. It is also called Device-to-Host Bandwidth. [[[ The CPU benchmark measures the classic memory read bandwidth, the performance the CPU could read data from the system memory. ]]] 2) Memory Write: Measures the bandwidth between the CPU and the GPU device, effectively measuring the performance the GPU could copy data from the system memory into its own device memory. It is also called Host-to-Device Bandwidth. [[[ The CPU benchmark measures the classic memory write bandwidth, the performance the CPU could write data into the system memory. ]]] 3) Memory Copy: Measures the performance of the GPU's own device memory, effectively measuring the performance the GPU could copy data from its own device memory to another place in the same device memory. It is also called Device-to-Device Bandwidth. [[[ The CPU benchmark measures the classic memory copy bandwidth, the performance the CPU could move data in the system memory from one place to another. ]]] 4) Single-Precision FLOPS: Measures the classic MAD (Multiply-Addition) performance of the GPU, otherwise known as FLOPS (Floating-Point Operations Per Second), with single-precision (32-bit, "float") floating-point data. 5) Double-Precision FLOPS: Measures the classic MAD (Multiply-Addition) performance of the GPU, otherwise known as FLOPS (Floating-Point Operations Per Second), with double-precision (64-bit, "double") floating-point data. Not all GPUs support double-precision floating-point operations. For example, all current Intel desktop and mobile graphics devices only support single-precision floating-point operations. 6) 24-bit Integer IOPS: Measures the classic MAD (Multiply-Addition) performance of the GPU, otherwise known as IOPS (Integer Operations Per Second), with 24-bit integer ("int24") data. This special data type are defined in OpenCL on the basis that many GPUs are capable of executing int24 operations via their floating-point units, effectively increasing the integer performance by a factor of 3 to 5, as compared to using 32-bit integer operations. 7) 32-bit Integer IOPS: Measures the classic MAD (Multiply-Addition) performance of the GPU, otherwise known as IOPS (Integer Operations Per Second), with 32-bit integer ("int") data. 8) 64-bit Integer IOPS: Measures the classic MAD (Multiply-Addition) performance of the GPU, otherwise known as IOPS (Integer Operations Per Second), with 64-bit integer ("long") data. Most GPUs do not have dedicated execution resources for 64-bit integer operations, so instead they emulate the 64-bit integer operations via existing 32-bit integer execution units. In such case 64-bit integer performance could be very low. 9) Single-Precision Julia: Measures the single-precision (32-bit, "float") floating-point performance through the computation of several frames of the popular "Julia" fractal. 10) Double-Precision Mandel: Measures the double-precision (64-bit, "double") floating-point performance through the computation of several frames of the popular "Mandelbrot" fractal. Not all GPUs support double-precision floating-point operations. For example, all current Intel desktop and mobile graphics devices only support single-precision floating-point operations. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ As for the GPGPU Benchmark Panel's user interface: 1) You can use the checkboxes to enable or disable utilizing a specific GPU device or the CPU. The state of the CPU checkbox is remembered after closing and re-opening the panel. 2) You can launch the benchmarks for the selected devices by pushing the Start Benchmark button. In case you want to run all benchmarks, but only on the GPU(s), you can double-click on the GPU column label to do so. In case you only want to run the Memory Read benchmarks on both the GPU(s) and the CPU, you can double-click on the Memory Read label to do so. In case you only want to run the Memory Read benchmark on only the GPU(s), you can double-click on the cell where the requested result should appear after the benchmark is completed. 3) The benchmarks are executed simultaneously on all selected GPUs, using multiple threads and multiple OpenCL context, each with a single command queue. CPU benchmarks however are only launched after the GPU benchmarks are completed. It is currently not possible to run the GPU and CPU benchmarks simultaneously. 4) In case the system has multiple GPUs, the first results column will display an aggregated score for all GPUs. The individual GPU results are combined (added up), and the column label will read e.g. "4 GPUs". If you want to check the individual results, you can either uncheck some of the GPUs until just one GPU is left checked, or push the Results button to open the results window. 5) In case you've got exactly two GPU devices, and you disable the CPU test by unclicking its checkbox, the panel will switch to dual-GPU mode where the first column will be used for GPU1 results, and the second column will be used for GPU2 results. If after obtaining the results you want to check the combined performance of GPU1+GPU2, just check the CPU again, and the interface will switch back to the default layout. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ FAQ: Q: Is it possible to measure performance of OpenCL CPU devices? A: No, it's not available currently, because OpenCL CPU drivers are simply not suitable for proper benchmarking. They execute code a lot slower than native x86/x64 machine code or sometimes even regular multi-threaded C++ code. Q: Do AIDA64 GPGPU benchmarks use vectorized data types and unrolling techniques to boost performance? A: Yes, both, in order to make the job of OpenCL compilers a bit easier. On top of that, the OpenCL compiler may still use additional optimizations, like further unrolling, it is completely up to the OpenCL compiler. Q: Is the OpenCL-capable VIA chipset (VX11) supported? A: No, because currently there's no stable OpenCL compiler and OpenCL driver for VIA chipsets or processors. Q: Are OpenCL 2.0 and HSA supported on AMD Kaveri systems? A: Yes, except for the memory benchmarks. Memory benchmarks currently don't work with HSA, because the current AMD HSA implementation doesn't yet support forcing the usage of device memory, but instead it automatically assumes that allocated memory blocks are to be shared between the CPU and GPU. As soon as AMD's OpenCL 2.0 and HSA implementation gets more mature, these issues will be resolved. Q: Are the latest generation dGPUs, like AMD Radeon R9 290/290X, nVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan and GTX 780 fully supported? A: Yes, but on such dGPUs where clock boosting and/or throttling is used, it is very important to decide whether you want to measure the absolute maximum attainable performance, or the average performance. If you're looking for the absolute maximum scores, then make sure to start AIDA64 GPGPU Benchmarks when the video card is cool, and with power limits set to a relaxed value (AMD PowerControl). If you're looking for the average performance, then make sure to disable the CPU benchmarks, and execute the GPU benchmark methods at least 10 times right after each other, to properly heat the video card up. Q: Is OpenCL benchmarking under Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 R2 supported? A: Yes, as long as the video drivers are properly installed. Q: On the Intel Core i7 "Haswell" processor, the CPU results are all considerably higher than the Intel HD Graphics 4600 "GT2" GPU results. How is that possible? A: AIDA64 CPU benchmarks are heavily optimized for Haswell and all other modern CPU architectures, and they utilize any available instruction set extensions like SSE, AVX, AVX2, FMA or XOP, and of course full vectorization as well. Using FMA and AVX2, a quad-core Haswell's x86/x64 part can indeed provide very high computing performance, well exceeding the performance of its GT2 iGPU. It is however much easier to write such optimized code for the iGPU via OpenCL, than for the CPU via machine code generator or x86/x64 assembly. ------------------------------------------------------------------------ You can try the new OpenCL GPGPU Benchmarks in the following new beta release of AIDA64 Extreme: http://www.aida64.com/downloads/aida64extremebuild2656b7hl0kzgtszip After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Please let us know here in this topic if you've got any comments or ideas about the new benchmarks.
  5. Fiery

    AIDA64 and Aorus Graphics Engine doesn't work

    Thank you for your feedback!
  6. Along with the Logitech Arx integration, we've also come up with a new LCD module that basically acts as a web server. You can use your main computer to run AIDA64 on it and maintain its built-in web server, and you can use your other computers or mobile devices to monitor your main computer's status remotely, using nothing but a web browser. You can activate it in AIDA64 / main menu / File / Preferences / Hardware Monitoring / LCD / RemoteSensor. Once you activated it, you can enter the IP address in virtually any web browsers to connect to the RemoteSensor. You can check the primary IP address of your computer on the Computer / Summary page in AIDA64. If it is e.g. 192.168.1.123, then enter the following in the address bar of your web browser: http://192.168.1.123 Or, in case you use a different TCP/IP port than the default http port of 80, then enter the address like this: http://192.168.1.123:8080 (if you use a TCP/IP port of 8080) Or, in case you try to use a web browser on the same computer where AIDA64 is running, you can simply use "localhost" instead of the IP address, like this: http://localhost Once you did that, you should see the AIDA64 splash screen in your web browser. It will provide you with information on the resolution that you need to use to get the most out of the LCD layout designer. On iOS devices the default setting should be close to the actual value to use, while on Android and other devices it may not match at all, so you need to change both the width and height. Please note that the Preview Resolution usually will not match the native screen resolution of your device. It's not a problem at all, and that discrepancy is due to the way web browsers manage the pixels of your screen, so don't be surprised that e.g. an iPhone 5 would report a Preview Resolution of 980 x 1360 pixels After the Preview Resolution is updated on the AIDA64 / main menu / File / Preferences / Hardware Monitoring / LCD page, you can use the same LCD layout designer that you would use for other LCD devices or the SensorPanel. Known issues and limitations: 1) Graphs and gauges are not implemented yet. We're planning to add them in the next few weeks. 2) RemoteSensor uses HTML5 SSE (Server-Sent Events) to refresh the web page, without having to reload it all the time. SSE is supported by almost all major web browsers, including Android Browser, BlackBerry 10 Browser, Chrome, FireFox, Opera, and Safari. However, it is sadly not yet supported by Internet Explorer. AIDA64 implements a trick to get around that limitation, but it sometimes will result in a mixup of the browser. If you notice that after changing the LCD layout in the AIDA64 Preferences, a strange log replaces the LCD layout in your browser, just refresh the web page. Hopefully Microsoft will finally implement SSE support in Internet Explorer 12 3) In order to prevent your mobile device from going to sleep while having the web browser open, you may need to install special apps on your mobile device. RemoteSensor has absolutely no control over the power management behavior of your mobile device. In case this is a deal breaker for you, and you've got a Logitech Gaming hardware, consider using Logitech Arx instead of the RemoteSensor. You can try the RemoteSensor in the following new AIDA64 beta update: http://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta Please let us know how it works on your mobile devices Thanks, Fiery
  7. Make sure to upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Let me know if it helps.
  8. Fiery

    Maximum resolution not found.

    It's because model/SKU information wasn't encoded in the EDID block of your monitor by the manufacturer of the monitor (AU Optronics in this case).
  9. If you cannot use the nVIDIA GPU for any purposes, then that may qualify for RMA.
  10. Great! Thank you for finding the culprit
  11. Fiery

    New LCD device support: Saitek

    I've sent you a private message about this.
  12. We've added support for Saitek X52 Pro and Pro Flight Instrument Panel MFD displays, as described at: http://www.saitek.com/uk/prod/x52pro.html http://www.saitek.com/uk/prod/fip.html You can enable the LCD device from AIDA64 / main menu / File / Preferences / Hardware Monitoring / LCD / Saitek. The only thing needed to enable this feature is having the appropriate drivers installed for your device. The AIDA64 Saitek MFD module supports up to 8 pages on both device types. You can find the new AIDA64 beta update at: http://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta Please let us know if you find any difficulties enabling or using this new feature. Also let us know if you've got another kind of LCD or VFD device that is currently unsupported by AIDA64. BTW, UCSD LCD is also supported now by the latest AIDA64 beta. Regards, Fiery
  13. I don't know Maybe the nVIDIA Control Panel has the ability to configure such settings for your GPU?
  14. I don't think your motherboard is capable of monitoring VRM temperature. We'll add the missing fan readings in the next AIDA64 beta update. I'll drop a message into this topic once the new AIDA64 beta is available for download.
  15. It's most likely because your GPU goes to sleep shortly after AIDA64 wakes it up Can you configure your nVIDIA GPU to be active a bit longer? Maybe from A/C power it's not as urgent to go back to sleep?
  16. Try to enable the option Wake GPUs up at AIDA64 startup in AIDA64 / main menu / File / Preferences / Stability, and restart AIDA64.
  17. They will be removed in the next AIDA64 beta build.
  18. Those are the thermal readings that HWiNFO64 reports as Temperature 4 and Temperature 6 (on your screen shot). If you think those readings should be removed for your motherboard, let me know.
  19. It's great that you could solve it by yourself. But, in order to avoid such issues in the future, we've changed AIDA64 to send the Auto Line Wrap Off command at Adafruit LCD init as well. Make sure to upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade.
  20. Fiery

    Fix BCLK at 100

    We've added a new AIDA64.INI option to let you use a rounded BCLK. Make sure to upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Then start AIDA64, go to main menu / File / Preferences, simply press OK. Then close AIDA64, go to the AIDA64 installation folder, find the file called AIDA64.INI, open it in Notepad, find the following line in it: RoundedFSB=0 Change 0 to 1, to make it look like this: RoundedFSB=1 And start AIDA64. Now the BCLK/FSB should be rounded to an exact number. Please note that it only works if the BCLK/FSB is drifted no more than 3% from the reference clock of 100MHz.
  21. Please upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Let me know how it works.
  22. We've added the missing thermal readings in the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade.
  23. Thank you for the data. Make sure to upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Let me know how it works
  24. Fiery

    AIDA64 and Aorus Graphics Engine doesn't work

    Please upgrade to the latest beta version of AIDA64 Extreme available at: https://www.aida64.com/downloads/latesta64xebeta After upgrading to this new version, make sure to restart Windows to finalize the upgrade. Let me know if it helps.
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