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Battery charge rate not displayed / iPhone and iPad

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Is it an OS restriction?

Can't be hardware because the iPad Pro doesn't show it.

most, if not all, top of the line androids do show this value.

Example from a Samsung:

<<< Battery >>>

Power Source: A/C Charger

Level: 100 %

Status: Full

Health: Good

Technology: Li-ion

Temperature: 20.6°C

Voltage: 4.390 V

Charge Rate: 78.0 mA

Capacity: 5870 mAh

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iOS and Windows Phone (Windows 10 Mobile) use way stricter sandboxing than Android or Tizen. If something's possible under Android, it doesn't mean you can do the same on other platforms too ;)

Under iOS it's not possible to measure or detect battery health, battery temperature and charge rate.

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iOS and Windows Phone (Windows 10 Mobile) use way stricter sandboxing than Android or Tizen...

Yeah, that's what I suspected. There's that ac/dc song that comes to mind; I can hear Bon Scott's voice....

The next question is not iOS or iPhone related, though the subject is the same.

I installed aida64 on two Samsung devices: one tablet top of the line and one galaxy smartphone not so top of the line, but still a galaxy model that isn't cheap. Both rooted and both running lollipop. The tablet shows battery rate but the smartphone does not...

Thx.

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I installed aida64 on two Samsung devices: one tablet top of the line and one galaxy smartphone not so top of the line, but still a galaxy model that isn't cheap. Both rooted and both running lollipop. The tablet shows battery rate but the smartphone does not...

That's quite normal. Battery charge rate measurement has to be implemented on each platform, by the manufacturer of the device. Some manufacturers are very thorough about this, and they implement it for every device they make, while others only implement it on a certain range of devices. It's a mystery why they leave certain devices out, while they care to implement battery charge rate on others...

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And the latest aida64 update is now showing the charge rate.

On iOS, yes, we've managed to find an undocumented method to measure battery charge rate and a few other bits & pieces about battery ;)

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Thanks for adding all the battery data to AIDA64 on iOS - being able to see voltage, cycle count and current goes a long way in helping to properly preserve and maintain the battery on my iPhone.

 

One thing I have always wanted to do is be able to set a maximum charge limit on the battery - as battery endurance is heavily impacted by the maximum charging voltage (in addition to time, charge cycles and temperature), I've always wanted to keep my devices from charging above 4V (around 70% of maximum charge) to help prevent the battery from wearing out too quickly (my iPhone is almost always plugged into a charger as I am 'chained' to my desk most of the day). Charging to 4.3V or even 4.4V on a regular basis is great for getting long single charges each day, but it wears these Li-ion batteries out extremely fast. My iPhone 6s battery has only had 235 cycles but is already at a 13% wear level, and I've only owned it for seven months now.

 

http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries

 

This is a bit of a long shot as this is something Apple should be implementing themselves (but won't), but if you could find a way to limit the maximum charge of an iOS device, that would be fantastic. :)

(After all, Tesla does this in its electric cars - allows users to specify the maximum charge between 50-100%, so yeah...)

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Well displaying this extended battery info on iOS is an undocumented method and I'm not sure about this won't be closed sooner or later and also this is only a read only access to this information so limiting the charging process is not possible with this. Anyway as I mentioned this is undocumented, we still collecting data from submitted reports to see how it works on different devices. For example there is a 2-3% difference between the reported capacity versus the capacity written on the battery and also it seems with new batteries the device charges it over the reported (and even the written) capacity. According to the reports we got, your 13% wear level and 235 cycles seems average.

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I understand completely, it's quite amazing you found the undocumented method to bring the battery details up in the first place, and for that I'm thankful. As I wrote, battery controls are the kind of thing Apple should be implementing themselves (but choose not to), so I'm letting you guys know in case you find other undocumented methods that there's demand for maximum charge control. Who knows :)

 

I'm not surprised my iPhone's wear level is average, a typical lithium-ion battery would have this wear level after the conditions it's been subjected to. From my observations of AIDA64 over the last few days, the iPhone 6s' battery seems to hover around 30℃ if the phone is unlocked and screen is on with medium brightness (23℃ ambient temperature). It will go down to around 25℃ with the screen off/phone locked. Battery spends most of its time at 100% charge.

 

Yet with my notebook computer (Lenovo ThinkPad E430), the battery in it has had 183 cycles but only 7% wear level (current full capacity 49.14Wh vs rated capacity of 52.84Wh). It spends its time at around the same temperature (between 27℃ and 30℃), but is kept at a maximum of 70% charge. The battery is more than 3.5 years old. My iPhone 6s is only seven months old yet is already double the wear level. I'm sure lowering the maximum charge made a big difference here...

 

Interesting how your reports are indicating the batteries seem to be charging beyond their rated capacity though...

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greetings...

you may have noticed that ios10 broke some battery infromation details in aida64....

Battery

Status Discharging

Level 29 %

Voltage 3.8 V

Capacity 10307 mAh

Type Li-Ion Polymer

Battery Details

cheers!

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greetings...

you may have noticed that ios10 broke some battery infromation details in aida64....

Battery

Status Discharging

Level 29 %

Voltage 3.8 V

Capacity 10307 mAh

Type Li-Ion Polymer

Battery Details

cheers!

 

Hi, yes, we have noticed. Unfortunately Apple has decided to block this method we used to obtain the battery info.

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